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Join us on the last Friday of every month!

A discussion between scientists, health professionals, educators, and pain advocates on a myriad of topics related to chronic pain. Offering a platform for innovative minds to bring forward inspiring ideas and discover solutions to help you in your practice.  

Before attending or watching any National Pain Round sessions, please read our disclaimers.

This program receives funding from the Government of Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada.

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National Pain Rounds

Introducing National Pain Rounds for Trainees!  See the Schedule >

May National Pain Rounds

Toward democratization of health: Thinking critically about the role of patient engagement in chronic pain research 

Meaningful engagement with people with lived experience is increasingly recognized and practiced in the chronic pain space. Processes and practices of engagement still face many challenges, especially when it comes to engaging with systemically and structurally marginalized groups. This session will focus on the work developed through the SSHRC-funded Partnership for the Engagement of People in Pain Research (PEPR), which aims to advance social science research in the field of chronic pain and build capacity for critical social science approaches to pain research. 

Fiona Webster is a Professor and Associate Director Nursing Research in The Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University, and a Faculty Scholar, Faculty of Health Sciences (2023-20-25). Professor Webster received her PhD (sociology) from the University of Toronto. She is an adjunct fellow at the Centre for Critical Qualitative Health Research at the University of Toronto (UofT), where is also a cross-appointed Professor in Social and Behavioral Sciences. She is currently the Director of PEPR, a SSHRC funded national Partnership program https://www.pepr-partnership.org/ and founder of CASPR, an international community of practice of scholars conducting critical approaches to scholarship in pain research (https://criticalpainscholarship.ca/). Professor Webster’s program of research is built upon a career-long interest in applying the tools, theories and insights of sociology to advance health equity and social justice in the field of chronic pain.

Fiona Webster

Dr. Laura Connoy is a sociologist and Postdoctoral Associate at Western University for the CIHR funded COPE II Study and the SSHRC funded PEPR Partnership, both of which are led by Dr. Fiona Webster. Her research centres on the health-related experiences of mobile and marginalized populations. Specifically, she researches the social factors of significance that underlie the chronic pain experiences of people who are subjected to processes of marginalization, and new forms of meaningful patient engagement with this population. Additionally, as the Principal Investigator of a SSHRC funded study, Dr. Connoy studies the social forms of trauma that shape and compound women’s experiences of chronic pain.

Laura Connoy 

Leigha Comer is a postdoctoral researcher at Western University with the Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing. Her research is largely qualitative and ethnographic in nature and focuses on chronic pain, opioid use, drug policy, disability, and the organization of care for chronic illness. She is also engaged in public health research on topics including digital health surveillance, infectious disease spread, and public health intervention research.

Leigha Comer 

Graham is a critical sociologist and recently completed his PhD in rehabilitation sciences at UBC (2023), and is now a post-doctoral fellow at Humber River Health and the University of Toronto.

Graham MacDonald 

Anuj Bhatia is a Professor in the Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine at the University of Toronto and the Director of the Comprehensive Integrated Pain Program at University Health Network, Toronto. He is the Chair of the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group of the Canadian Pain Society, President of the Canadian Neuromodulation Society, Chair of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s Pain Medicine Specialty committee, Co-Chair of the North American Neuromodulation Society’s Research Committee and a member of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s Research Committee. He has an Adjunct Faculty appointment at the Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation. His clinical and research interests include the use of epidemiological tools and wearable technology for assessing outcomes of neuromodulation and other interventional treatments for chronic neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain. He has published over 100 papers, 6 book chapters, and co-authored two books on interventional pain procedures. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of Anesthesia & Analgesia, Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Journal of Pain, the Canadian Journal of Pain, and Pain Medicine. He was a member of the international guideline development panel for the use of intravenous ketamine infusions, the role of contrast during pain procedures, and cervical and lumbar facet, and sacroiliac joint interventions for relieving pain.

Anuj Bhatia

Prof Philip Peng is the professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine of University of Toronto. He is a leader, researcher, educator and pioneer in the application of ultrasound for pain medicine. His contribution of pain education resulted in “Founder” status from Royal College in Pain Medicine in Canada, and the Award of Recognition of Education in Pain Medicine by ESRA. His innovative research led to different new procedures in pain intervention such as ultrasound guided pudendal nerve block and PENG block. He received numerous awards including the John J Bonica award from ASRA, Distinguished Service Award from both ESRA-Spain and Canadian Pain Society, Gold Medal Award from Canadian Anesthesiology Society. He is the inaugural fellow to ASRA (FASRA) which recognizes the contribution of prominent member of the field. He has delivered more than 500 lectures and workshops nationally and internationally. He has edited 8 books and published 260 peer reviewed publications and book chapters.

Philip Peng

Harsha Shanthanna is a Professor in the Department of Anesthesia, and an associate member in the Departments of Surgery, HEI, and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University. Apart from anesthesia, he had advanced training in chronic pain and health research methodology. He serves in various capacities at national and international organizations including Chair of Interventional Pain Special Interest Group, Canadian Pain Society; member of Research Grant sub-committee, Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society; member of Regulatory and Guidance committee, and Editorial member of newsletter for the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA-PM). He has been successful in more than 45 peer reviewed grant applications, published more than 120 peer reviewed journal articles, and 8 book chapters. He serves as an associate editor for Canadian Journal of Pain, and Anesthesia and Analgesia.

Harsha Shanthanna

May Pain Rounds for Trainees

Canadian Interventional Pain Guidelines for Axial Procedures

Open to learners in the field of pain medicine, sessions will enhance medical education by promoting standardized pain management practices, fostering collaboration among those practicing pain medicine, and improving patient outcomes through evidence-based pain assessments and treatment practices.

Dr. Bradley Kerr received his BSc in Psychology from McGill University. He then went on to obtain a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of London-King’s College in the UK. His PhD research was aimed at understanding the role of novel modulatory peptides, growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines in persistent pain. Dr. Kerr went on to do postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology and at McGill University where his work focused on studying inflammatory responses after nervous system injury. Dr. Kerr joined the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at the University of Alberta in 2007 and is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Psychiatry. The focus of research in his lab is aimed at addressing the mechanisms of chronic pain after injury or disease with a major focus on chronic pain associated with Multiple Sclerosis.

Bradley Kerr

Professor Zameel Cader is the Director of the Oxford Headache Centre and a Consultant Neurologist. He is Professor of Neuroscience and Neurology at the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience and the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Discovery, Oxford. He is founder and director for Oxford StemTech and Human-Centric. He undertook medical training at Birmingham and Oxford and completed a PhD in neurogenetics at the University of Oxford. He has previously led StemBANCC and now leads IM2PACT – a large public-private partnership to characterise the human blood-brain-barrier and develop new transport mechanism to get therapies into the brain. His academic research programme is focused on understanding the disease process in migraine and pain using omics, human stem cell disease models and preclinical in vivo models. His group works to bring more effective and personalised treatments for these disabling disorders from bench to bedside.

Zameel Cader

Jennifer’s professional background is in marketing and strategic planning in higher education. Since a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain, she has been on a journey of learning to live with persistent acute episodes of pain and adapting to the dramatic changes this has brought to her daily life. She has leveraged her skills and experience to advocate, collaborate and share her perspective as a person with lived experience/patient partner/advisor with national and provincial pain research initiatives and projects, including with the Chronic Pain Network, Pain Ontario and the Canadian Pain Society. She advocates for the incorporation of the lived experience perspective into research, broadened awareness of chronic pain, improving understanding about the value of patient engagement in research and for improved access to health care and support for people living with pain.

Jennifer Daly-Cyr

Dr. Mike Hildebrand completed his PhD in neurophysiology in Dr. Terry Snutch’s lab at UBC, followed by an industrial R&D fellowship in preclinical pain research at Zalicus Pharmaceuticals in Vancouver. After this, Dr. Hildebrand completed an academic postdoctoral fellowship in Mike Salter’s lab at Sick Kids Hospital. Dr. Hildebrand is now leading his own translational pain research program as a Professor in the Neuroscience Department at Carleton University and as an Affiliate Investigator at The Ottawa Hospital. His NSERC-, CIHR-, and industry-funded research team is studying both acute and chronic pain processing using animal and human tissue models. Dr. Hildebrand is also the Chair of the Scientific Program Committee of the Canadian Pain Society and Associate Dean in the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs at Carleton University.

Mike Hildebrand

Fiona Webster is a Professor and Associate Director Nursing Research in The Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University, and a Faculty Scholar, Faculty of Health Sciences (2023-20-25). Professor Webster received her PhD (sociology) from the University of Toronto. She is an adjunct fellow at the Centre for Critical Qualitative Health Research at the University of Toronto (UofT), where is also a cross-appointed Professor in Social and Behavioral Sciences. She is currently the Director of PEPR, a SSHRC funded national Partnership program https://www.pepr-partnership.org/ and founder of CASPR, an international community of practice of scholars conducting critical approaches to scholarship in pain research (https://criticalpainscholarship.ca/). Professor Webster’s program of research is built upon a career-long interest in applying the tools, theories and insights of sociology to advance health equity and social justice in the field of chronic pain

Fiona Webster

Graham is a critical sociologist and recently completed his PhD in rehabilitation sciences at UBC (2023), and is now a post-doctoral fellow at Humber River Health and the University of Toronto.

Graham MacDonald

Dr. Laura Connoy is a sociologist and Postdoctoral Associate at Western University for the CIHR funded COPE II Study and the SSHRC funded PEPR Partnership, both of which are led by Dr. Fiona Webster. Her research centres on the health-related experiences of mobile and marginalized populations. Specifically, she researches the social factors of significance that underlie the chronic pain experiences of people who are subjected to processes of marginalization, and new forms of meaningful patient engagement with this population. Additionally, as the Principal Investigator of a SSHRC funded study, Dr. Connoy studies the social forms of trauma that shape and compound women’s experiences of chronic pain.

Laura Connoy

Leigha Comer is a postdoctoral researcher at Western University with the Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing. Her research is largely qualitative and ethnographic in nature and focuses on chronic pain, opioid use, drug policy, disability, and the organization of care for chronic illness. She is also engaged in public health research on topics including digital health surveillance, infectious disease spread, and public health intervention research.

Leigha Comer

Information for this speaker is on the way!

Don Richardson

Harsha Shanthanna is a Professor in the Department of Anesthesia, and an associate member in the Departments of Surgery, HEI, and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University. Apart from anesthesia, he had advanced training in chronic pain and health research methodology. He serves in various capacities at national and international organizations including Chair of Interventional Pain Special Interest Group, Canadian Pain Society; member of Research Grant sub-committee, Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society; member of Regulatory and Guidance committee, and Editorial member of newsletter for the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA-PM). He has been successful in more than 45 peer reviewed grant applications, published more than 120 peer reviewed journal articles, and 8 book chapters. He serves as an associate editor for Canadian Journal of Pain, and Anesthesia and Analgesia.

Harsha Shanthanna

Prof Philip Peng is the professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine of University of Toronto. He is a leader, researcher, educator and pioneer in the application of ultrasound for pain medicine. His contribution of pain education resulted in “Founder” status from Royal College in Pain Medicine in Canada, and the Award of Recognition of Education in Pain Medicine by ESRA. His innovative research led to different new procedures in pain intervention such as ultrasound guided pudendal nerve block and PENG block. He received numerous awards including the John J Bonica award from ASRA, Distinguished Service Award from both ESRA-Spain and Canadian Pain Society, Gold Medal Award from Canadian Anesthesiology Society. He is the inaugural fellow to ASRA (FASRA) which recognizes the contribution of prominent member of the field. He has delivered more than 500 lectures and workshops nationally and internationally. He has edited 8 books and published 260 peer reviewed publications and book chapters.

Philip Peng

Anuj Bhatia is a Professor in the Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine at the University of Toronto and the Director of the Comprehensive Integrated Pain Program at University Health Network, Toronto. He is the Chair of the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group of the Canadian Pain Society, President of the Canadian Neuromodulation Society, Chair of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s Pain Medicine Specialty committee, Co-Chair of the North American Neuromodulation Society’s Research Committee and a member of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s Research Committee. He has an Adjunct Faculty appointment at the Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation. His clinical and research interests include the use of epidemiological tools and wearable technology for assessing outcomes of neuromodulation and other interventional treatments for chronic neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain. He has published over 100 papers, 6 book chapters, and co-authored two books on interventional pain procedures. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of Anesthesia & Analgesia, Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Journal of Pain, the Canadian Journal of Pain, and Pain Medicine. He was a member of the international guideline development panel for the use of intravenous ketamine infusions, the role of contrast during pain procedures, and cervical and lumbar facet, and sacroiliac joint interventions for relieving pain.

Anuj Bhatia

May

Canadian Interventional Pain Guidelines for Axial Procedures

Open to learners in the field of pain medicine, sessions will enhance medical education by promoting standardized pain management practices, fostering collaboration among those practicing pain medicine, and improving patient outcomes through evidence-based pain assessments and treatment practices.

September

Presentation details coming soon

Open to learners in the field of pain medicine, sessions will enhance medical education by promoting standardized pain management practices, fostering collaboration among those practicing pain medicine, and improving patient outcomes through evidence-based pain assessments and treatment practices.

June

Pain and Trauma

Open to learners in the field of pain medicine, sessions will enhance medical education by promoting standardized pain management practices, fostering collaboration among those practicing pain medicine, and improving patient outcomes through evidence-based pain assessments and treatment practices.

Pain Rounds for Trainees

Dr. Bradley Kerr received his BSc in Psychology from McGill University. He then went on to obtain a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of London-King’s College in the UK. His PhD research was aimed at understanding the role of novel modulatory peptides, growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines in persistent pain. Dr. Kerr went on to do postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology and at McGill University where his work focused on studying inflammatory responses after nervous system injury. Dr. Kerr joined the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at the University of Alberta in 2007 and is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Psychiatry. The focus of research in his lab is aimed at addressing the mechanisms of chronic pain after injury or disease with a major focus on chronic pain associated with Multiple Sclerosis.

Bradley Kerr

Professor Zameel Cader is the Director of the Oxford Headache Centre and a Consultant Neurologist. He is Professor of Neuroscience and Neurology at the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience and the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Discovery, Oxford. He is founder and director for Oxford StemTech and Human-Centric. He undertook medical training at Birmingham and Oxford and completed a PhD in neurogenetics at the University of Oxford. He has previously led StemBANCC and now leads IM2PACT – a large public-private partnership to characterise the human blood-brain-barrier and develop new transport mechanism to get therapies into the brain. His academic research programme is focused on understanding the disease process in migraine and pain using omics, human stem cell disease models and preclinical in vivo models. His group works to bring more effective and personalised treatments for these disabling disorders from bench to bedside.

Zameel Cader

Jennifer’s professional background is in marketing and strategic planning in higher education. Since a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain, she has been on a journey of learning to live with persistent acute episodes of pain and adapting to the dramatic changes this has brought to her daily life. She has leveraged her skills and experience to advocate, collaborate and share her perspective as a person with lived experience/patient partner/advisor with national and provincial pain research initiatives and projects, including with the Chronic Pain Network, Pain Ontario and the Canadian Pain Society. She advocates for the incorporation of the lived experience perspective into research, broadened awareness of chronic pain, improving understanding about the value of patient engagement in research and for improved access to health care and support for people living with pain.

Jennifer Daly-Cyr

Dr. Mike Hildebrand completed his PhD in neurophysiology in Dr. Terry Snutch’s lab at UBC, followed by an industrial R&D fellowship in preclinical pain research at Zalicus Pharmaceuticals in Vancouver. After this, Dr. Hildebrand completed an academic postdoctoral fellowship in Mike Salter’s lab at Sick Kids Hospital. Dr. Hildebrand is now leading his own translational pain research program as a Professor in the Neuroscience Department at Carleton University and as an Affiliate Investigator at The Ottawa Hospital. His NSERC-, CIHR-, and industry-funded research team is studying both acute and chronic pain processing using animal and human tissue models. Dr. Hildebrand is also the Chair of the Scientific Program Committee of the Canadian Pain Society and Associate Dean in the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs at Carleton University.

Mike Hildebrand

Fiona Webster is a Professor and Associate Director Nursing Research in The Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University, and a Faculty Scholar, Faculty of Health Sciences (2023-20-25). Professor Webster received her PhD (sociology) from the University of Toronto. She is an adjunct fellow at the Centre for Critical Qualitative Health Research at the University of Toronto (UofT), where is also a cross-appointed Professor in Social and Behavioral Sciences. She is currently the Director of PEPR, a SSHRC funded national Partnership program https://www.pepr-partnership.org/ and founder of CASPR, an international community of practice of scholars conducting critical approaches to scholarship in pain research (https://criticalpainscholarship.ca/). Professor Webster’s program of research is built upon a career-long interest in applying the tools, theories and insights of sociology to advance health equity and social justice in the field of chronic pain

Fiona Webster

Graham is a critical sociologist and recently completed his PhD in rehabilitation sciences at UBC (2023), and is now a post-doctoral fellow at Humber River Health and the University of Toronto.

Graham MacDonald

Dr. Laura Connoy is a sociologist and Postdoctoral Associate at Western University for the CIHR funded COPE II Study and the SSHRC funded PEPR Partnership, both of which are led by Dr. Fiona Webster. Her research centres on the health-related experiences of mobile and marginalized populations. Specifically, she researches the social factors of significance that underlie the chronic pain experiences of people who are subjected to processes of marginalization, and new forms of meaningful patient engagement with this population. Additionally, as the Principal Investigator of a SSHRC funded study, Dr. Connoy studies the social forms of trauma that shape and compound women’s experiences of chronic pain.

Laura Connoy

Leigha Comer is a postdoctoral researcher at Western University with the Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing. Her research is largely qualitative and ethnographic in nature and focuses on chronic pain, opioid use, drug policy, disability, and the organization of care for chronic illness. She is also engaged in public health research on topics including digital health surveillance, infectious disease spread, and public health intervention research.

Leigha Comer

Information for this speaker is on the way!

Don Richardson

Harsha Shanthanna is a Professor in the Department of Anesthesia, and an associate member in the Departments of Surgery, HEI, and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University. Apart from anesthesia, he had advanced training in chronic pain and health research methodology. He serves in various capacities at national and international organizations including Chair of Interventional Pain Special Interest Group, Canadian Pain Society; member of Research Grant sub-committee, Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society; member of Regulatory and Guidance committee, and Editorial member of newsletter for the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA-PM). He has been successful in more than 45 peer reviewed grant applications, published more than 120 peer reviewed journal articles, and 8 book chapters. He serves as an associate editor for Canadian Journal of Pain, and Anesthesia and Analgesia.

Harsha Shanthanna

Prof Philip Peng is the professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine of University of Toronto. He is a leader, researcher, educator and pioneer in the application of ultrasound for pain medicine. His contribution of pain education resulted in “Founder” status from Royal College in Pain Medicine in Canada, and the Award of Recognition of Education in Pain Medicine by ESRA. His innovative research led to different new procedures in pain intervention such as ultrasound guided pudendal nerve block and PENG block. He received numerous awards including the John J Bonica award from ASRA, Distinguished Service Award from both ESRA-Spain and Canadian Pain Society, Gold Medal Award from Canadian Anesthesiology Society. He is the inaugural fellow to ASRA (FASRA) which recognizes the contribution of prominent member of the field. He has delivered more than 500 lectures and workshops nationally and internationally. He has edited 8 books and published 260 peer reviewed publications and book chapters.

Philip Peng

Anuj Bhatia is a Professor in the Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine at the University of Toronto and the Director of the Comprehensive Integrated Pain Program at University Health Network, Toronto. He is the Chair of the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group of the Canadian Pain Society, President of the Canadian Neuromodulation Society, Chair of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s Pain Medicine Specialty committee, Co-Chair of the North American Neuromodulation Society’s Research Committee and a member of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s Research Committee. He has an Adjunct Faculty appointment at the Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation. His clinical and research interests include the use of epidemiological tools and wearable technology for assessing outcomes of neuromodulation and other interventional treatments for chronic neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain. He has published over 100 papers, 6 book chapters, and co-authored two books on interventional pain procedures. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of Anesthesia & Analgesia, Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Journal of Pain, the Canadian Journal of Pain, and Pain Medicine. He was a member of the international guideline development panel for the use of intravenous ketamine infusions, the role of contrast during pain procedures, and cervical and lumbar facet, and sacroiliac joint interventions for relieving pain.

Anuj Bhatia

September

Presentation details coming soon

More information coming soon

June

The science of pain - Learning from human cells 

Human cell research is pivotal in the pain space as it offers unparalleled insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms by bridging the gap between traditional preclinical animal models of pain and those that suffer from pain in society. Fundamental research findings using these new human tissue approaches can lead towards the development of targeted therapies. Engaging people with lived experience in this research is crucial as it ensures that the research is focused on what people actually need, leading to better health and a happier life for those dealing with pain. We will discuss some promising human cell research in development in our labs, highlighting how people with lived experience have been involved in these studies.

May

Toward democratization of health: Thinking critically about the role of patient engagement in chronic pain research 

Meaningful engagement with people with lived experience is increasingly recognized and practiced in the chronic pain space. Processes and practices of engagement still face many challenges, especially when it comes to engaging with systemically and structurally marginalized groups. This session will focus on the work developed through the SSHRC-funded Partnership for the Engagement of People in Pain Research (PEPR), which aims to advance social science research in the field of chronic pain and build capacity for critical social science approaches to pain research.

Pain Rounds for Professionals

Our Trainee Chairs

A platform for innovative minds to bring forward inspiring ideas and discover solutions to help you in your mentorship programs.

Providing educational resources for learners in efforts to prepare the next generation of pain management clinicians for the full scope of practice opportunities, from basic science research transitioning into clinical practice.

Co-Chair

Dr. Eugene Maida

Assistant Clinical Professor in the Departments of Medicine (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation) with a cross appointment in the Department of Anesthesia at McMaster University. Dr. Maida is a physiatrist and interventional pain physician with a special interest in spine and musculoskeletal medicine. He completed his residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and later completed  subspecialty training in the Pain Medicine residency program under the Department of Anesthesia at McMaster University. He has also completed a sports medicine research fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota, with a focus on Ultrasound Guided Musculoskeletal and Peripheral Nerve Interventions, as well as his diplomat in Sports and Exercise Medicine Physician through the Canadian Academy of Sports and Exercise Medicine (CASEM). Dr. Maida is currently the Medical Director of the Michael G. DeGroote pain clinic at McMaster University and Head of Service at Hamilton Health Sciences for Pain Behaviours for the department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Dr. Maida has worked as a team physician with the McMaster University varsity soccer and football teams, Canadian Junior National Basketball Team (NEDA) and is currently the Head Team Physician for the Hamilton Tiger Cats (CFL). Dr. Maida is also actively involved in resident and medical school education. He currently serves as Section Coordinator for pain medicine teaching in the department Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Education Coordinator for the Pain Medicine residency program under the department of Anaesthesia. Dr. Maida is also the current Chair of the Anesthesia pain rounds, and Lecturer for undergraduate introductory pain session for McMaster University medical students. In addition to being the co-chair of National Pain Rounds for trainees, Dr. Maida is also part of the National Pain Rounds Committee.

Co-Chair

Dr. Avinash Sinha

An assistant professor in the department of anesthesia at McGill University Health Center. He was born in India, raised & educated in the United Kingdom (UK), thus his practice as a physician & clinical teacher reflects the apprenticeship style of clinical education in the UK. Subsequent to a productive Fellowship training year in Toronto [2002-3], he relocated to Montréal; awarded an academic staff [Professeur Selectionné] anesthesiologist position at McGill in 2005. Regarded as an approachable expert resource in [ultrasound guided] regional anesthesia for nurse, trainee & staff colleagues, he is responsible for successfully implementing multi-disciplinary teams for enhanced recovery programs. Actively involved in education in pain management strategies in both anesthesia and surgical residency training programs, he promotes an integrated approach to complex acute & acute on chronic pain management in a busy trauma center, leveraging the resources of both the chronic & acute pain experts. He has pursued a greater understanding of education principles, through educational certificate courses [Harvard], faculty development resources [McGill] & leadership development [PLI & McGill Executive institute] culminating in departmental leadership in Medical student supervision. Aiming to implement a modern educational paradigm, he is working to develop asynchronous learning materials to support learners, curating & developing videos & vignettes according to student defined needs. Currently he is exploring education from multiple different perspectives, through Knowledge Translation and Implementation Science in the development of inter- professional teams. To enhance learner engagement through agency & partnership, in collaboration with Teaching & Learning services at McGill & the McGill Anesthesia Interest group, he is publishing a medical student handbook.

Our Dedicated Committee

Our National Pain Rounds Committee is made up of experienced healthcare professionals who strive to uphold and maintain the integrity of the Canadian Pain Society as dedicated volunteers. 

Co-Chair

Dr. John Xavier Pereira

President of the Canadian Pain Society, previous President of the Pain Society of Alberta, and a Founding Co-Chair of the Alberta Pain Strategy. He is a past Ronald Melzack Fellow of the McGill Pain Center and has spoken on the topic of chronic pain both nationally and internationally, including at the Centers for Disease Control, ANZCA Auckland, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Mayo Clinic. He represented Western Canada on the committee of physicians who wrote our country’s National Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia. Dr. John Pereira was the physician lead of FibroFOCUS, an interdisciplinary chronic pain program that won a 2016 Patient Experience Award from the Health Quality Council of Alberta. He was a member of the Canadian Pain Task Force's External Advisory Panel and a current member of Pain Canada's National Advisory Council. He has personally visited more than sixty pain clinics worldwide to learn best practices.

Co-Chair

Dr. Helena Daudt

Director of Education at Pain BC/Pain Canada. She leads Pain BC/Pain Canada’s educational initiatives including Making Sense of Pain, a self-management program designed for people living with pain, who experience marginalization and face barriers to accessing care and support. As an educator and researcher, Dr Daudt has been supporting healthcare improvement through patient engagement and knowledge exchange in different settings. She is also a person living with chronic pain and brings the lived experience lens to the work she does. Dr Daudt is passionate about building capacity among people with lived experience, their support network, and healthcare providers to ensure people receive high-quality care and experience the best quality of life possible.

Co-Chair

Dr. Bradley Kerr

Dr. Bradley Kerr received his BSc in Psychology from McGill University. He then went on to obtain a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of London-King’s College in the UK. His PhD research was aimed at understanding the role of novel modulatory peptides, growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines in persistent pain. Dr. Kerr went on to do postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology and at McGill University where his work focused on studying inflammatory responses after nervous system injury. Dr. Kerr joined the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at the University of Alberta in 2007 and is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Psychiatry. The focus of research in his lab is aimed at addressing the mechanisms of chronic pain after injury or disease with a major focus on chronic pain associated with Multiple Sclerosis.

 

Dr. Eugene Maida

Assistant Clinical Professor in the Departments of Medicine (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation) with a cross appointment in the Department of Anesthesia at McMaster University. Dr. Maida is a physiatrist and interventional pain physician with a special interest in spine and musculoskeletal medicine. He completed his residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and later completed subspecialty training in the Pain Medicine residency program under the Department of Anesthesia at McMaster University. He has also completed a sports medicine research fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota, with a focus on Ultrasound Guided Musculoskeletal and Peripheral Nerve Interventions, as well as his diplomat in Sports and Exercise Medicine Physician through the Canadian Academy of Sports and Exercise Medicine (CASEM). Dr. Maida is currently the Medical Director of the Michael G. DeGroote pain clinic at McMaster University and Head of Service at Hamilton Health Sciences for Pain Behaviours for the department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. In addition to being the co-chair of National Pain Rounds for trainees, Dr. Maida is also part of the National Pain Rounds Committee.

 

Dr. Tania Di Renna

Dr. Tania Di Renna, Associate Professor at the University of Toronto, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, completed her medical school and Anesthesiology residency training in Ottawa. She obtained a chronic pain fellowship at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and has spinal cord stimulation training from Montreal Neurological Institute. 

She is currently the Medical Director of the Toronto Academic Pain Medicine Institute (TAPMI). TAPMI is the comprehensive interdisciplinary academic pain program serving as the hub for chronic pain care in Toronto. She is also the Medical Director of the Chronic Pain Clinic at Women’s College Hospital and an Anesthesiologist at UHN. She served as the co-chair of the HQO Guidelines for Chronic Pain, is currently the co-chair of the Ontario Chronic Pain Network and Ontario Representative for Pain Canada.

 

Jennifer Daly-Cyr

Jennifer’s professional background is in marketing and strategic planning in higher education. Since a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain, she has been on a journey of learning to live with persistent acute episodes of pain and adapting to the dramatic changes this has brought to her daily life. She has leveraged her skills and experience to advocate, collaborate and share her perspective as a person with lived experience/patient partner/advisor with national and provincial pain research initiatives and projects, including with the Chronic Pain Network, Pain Ontario and the Canadian Pain Society. She advocates for the incorporation of the lived experience perspective into research, broadened awareness of chronic pain, improving understanding about the value of patient engagement in research and for improved access to health care and support for people living with pain.

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